Author Topic: Renovating Helterskelter  (Read 14366 times)

neil m

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Re: Renovating Helterskelter
« Reply #15 on: March 23, 2013, 08:39:32 PM »
Here are a couple of pics of the cover i made out of the porch awning, and this year i copied Phil again with fitting some tunnel lamps on the front. I had originally fitted  a light onto the rail on the roof thinking it would give a good view up there on the top but found the light tends to hit the welldeck and reflect back at you inside the boat..




neil m

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Re: Renovating Helterskelter
« Reply #16 on: March 27, 2013, 10:33:50 PM »
I had installed a 12v fridge, and we have a portable telly as well so found we were running low on battery after a couple of days, the Honda outboard has a charging coil which is rated at 6amps at 6000 rpm but i found only about 2amps going in on the meter at canal speed. So you can carry with you a small Generator to help out or one idea i saw on another trailboat was to add an alternator to the outboard.
So one winter i had a go at fitting one, I bought a small Lucas alternator similar to the old mini etc which will put out 25amps or so at peak output, I decided to put it at the back of the motor, so you have to cut the back of the engine tray off to fit it in. I removed the recoil starter and fitted a v pulley off an old power steering pump on top of the flywheel and fixed on by the flywheel nut, it has to be a pretty thin one and you need to lift the recoil up slightly with a couple of washers under the bolts to make up for it. I next made up some brackets from the bar left over from the handbrake lever. I made a bracket up on the fixed side that bolts to the bottom of the engine tray so it would be strong. and another on the other side for the swinging bracket. you need to use a straight edge to line up the pulleys, I bolted on a stainless steel plate to extend the engine tray under the alternator and drilled a number of holes in it to allow the fan to blow a bit if air through.







Now i had to extend the cover so cut the back off it and fixed a thin sheet off steel around it which would go over the alternator and glassed up the inside of it so you get the smooth side on the outside edge, when set remove the steel plate and lay up some more glass on it for the top edge, and when set glass that on to the top.
i fitted a couple of catches at the sides to make up for the original lost at the back.



To finish i gave it a coat of paint and got some stickers of the boat name to put on it. I thought this odd looking thing would maybe put off anybody looking to pinch an outboard as well. To wire it up you need three wires a positive and negative  to the battery and a field wire through  a switch and a warning light these i fitted on the boat near the battery master switch in the toilet compartment. I also added  roller to help tension the belt easily..
It seems to work pretty well and will recharge the battery in 30 mins or so of cruising, the only drawback i have found is if the battery is low and the alternator is charging at peak rate the engine struggles to tick over due to the extra load on it, to counter this i switch it on when we are off and running down the canal or run the engine at a fast idle while moored.
Now even if we are out for a week or more the battery is still full when we come back.