Author Topic: Steel work  (Read 10317 times)

Sarah

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Steel work
« on: September 28, 2015, 08:00:24 PM »
The beginning of our restoration rescue Jay has created some new steel framing for the tow package

neil m

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Re: Steel work
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2015, 10:01:20 PM »
looks great, in pretty solid shape judging by the picture. :)

phil riley

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Re: Steel work
« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2015, 10:14:07 PM »
Excellent work,great to see a first class restoration.

Sarah

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Re: Steel work
« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2015, 02:14:40 AM »
Thank you, Neil and Phil !

Stuart Kimber

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Re: Steel work
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2015, 10:00:34 PM »
A Stateside Caraboat! Outstanding!!
Have fun with it....
STUART

Sarah

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Re: Steel work
« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2015, 06:44:41 AM »
Thanks Stuart! We are so grateful to be a part of this forum.
Sarah and Jay

Stuart Kimber

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Re: Steel work
« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2015, 08:41:04 PM »
Here's hoping this link works.
You should find pictures of my wife Gill and I enjoying Caraboating on England's canals!
http://s989.photobucket.com/user/RevSKImber/media/Image010_11A_zpsb74cf848.jpg.html

STUART

Stuart Kimber

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Re: Steel work
« Reply #7 on: October 14, 2015, 08:44:04 PM »
PS.
Note we tow our Caraboat with a 1987 Dodge B250 Day Van!
5.2 litres of the American Dream.....

Sarah

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Re: Steel work
« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2015, 08:35:19 AM »
Stuart, your photo's are simply delightful! Thank you!
I so enjoy seeing everyone's caraboat and I'm
fascinated with your many canals. I plan to fashion a canal
chart/map within my decorating plans either by incorporating it
 In resin to the table top or wallpapering via decoupage.
I'm nervous about towing, happy to see your tow vehicle
As I drive a Ford E150 conversion van with a high top.
I've been thinking of buying a smaller tower tho.
Currently, Jay (my brother) is in the process of designing a new steel
tow hitch for me.  Towing will be a new experience for me.
Sincerely Sarah

Stuart Kimber

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Re: Steel work
« Reply #9 on: October 16, 2015, 05:55:42 PM »
Hi Sarah.
The joy of towing a Caraboat is that it's much narrower than a Caravan and you can see past it on both sides with no extension mirrors. You can also see right through it, so there are virtually no blind spots. However : the back end of the boat is very low to the ground and it's very difficult not to hit the ground if the road is rough and the outfit 'pitches.' I have a set of metal ramps to get it up the drop kerb on to my driveway. The level of the tow hitch on the twinge vehicle will be important : I've dropped mine quite low. Need to just check that the suspension units haven't sagged and lowered the boat more than usual. Yours doesn't look as though they have...

Kind regards
STUART

michael-griffin

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Re: Steel work
« Reply #10 on: October 16, 2015, 09:05:32 PM »
Ok Caraboater’s lets have a debate, after 40+ years all Caraboats must display some “sagging” unless they have been jacked up, with the wheels clear of the ground, after every trip.
I think Sarah’s Caraboat has sagged and probably needs to be knoched up by at least two splines, the side view of it under the canopy shows the tyres (sorry Sarah tires) very close to the wheel arch and its devoid of any internal fittings, glass? or engine.
I have now towed three different Caraboats and I have never had problems with the back end bottoming perhaps this is due to my adjustment of the link arm or drop arm being nearer to 5 o’clock than 3 o’clock (or 9 and 7 for the other side) so giving less deflection.
I did consult “Peak trailers” (now “Peak dynamics”) some years ago about the correct angle but their answer was “to the customer’s individual needs” or something like that.
The hitch height should be 16 inches.
The gauntlet is down, handbags at ten paces, but no falling out please.
Best wishes
Mick G 
 :-[

phil riley

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Re: Steel work
« Reply #11 on: October 16, 2015, 09:25:05 PM »
Hi Mick,I had to turn mine a spline or two to help give more clearance at he back when towing.I have also fitted larger wheels along with my hydraulic  brake set up.I would guess that after all these years,most of our suspension units will have sagged to some extent.Cheers,Phil.

neil m

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Re: Steel work
« Reply #12 on: October 16, 2015, 11:43:00 PM »
I think i moved mine a spline when I did Helterskelter, so it all looked about right. John Nelson told me the Mk1 boats had a lower rated units and was going to change them. I think it was one of the first things Stuart did when he got the boat. Do we know If Sarah's boat is a mark 1 or 2?
The other thing really worth doing which Phil told me about is use a leaf spring type stabaliser, this reduces the for and aft pitching by loads, there not expensive and easy to fit.
I have towed Helterskelter well over 6000 miles in the last ten years and never grounded yet.
all the best,
neil m


Stuart Kimber

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Re: Steel work
« Reply #13 on: October 17, 2015, 12:27:25 AM »
Well, this is interesting!
When I got my boat it was already quite damaged and repaired at the lowest point of the hull right at the back.
I then discovered that my suspension units were knackered to such an extent that my tyres were rubbing on the hull inside the wheel arches, so I had new suspension units fitted.  This improved matters considerably! As long as I don't go over nasty large speed bumps the back of my boat doesn't hit the ground anymore, but if I take it up a dropped kerb it does so I have to take precautions - and I still take it very carefully over uneven road surfaces. I certainly can't tow it with a 16 inch tow ball height. I also have some repaired cracking - already repaired by John Nelson who had the boat before me - just ahead of the wheel arch on one side where it meets the bottom of the hull. It may be that my boat is quite bent, but it doesn't look it!
What exactly do you mean by a 'spline'? Is it an adjustment of the suspension units?

I might learn something here!!

Regards
START

Sarah

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Re: Steel work
« Reply #14 on: October 17, 2015, 01:15:37 AM »
Mick, great looking out! Your amazing.
 I'm so happy to hear each of your experiences
And will surely share your outstanding collaborations with Jay the next time he is over.
Mick, I'm not sure if this all ties in but, Jay has said that the entire "inner" body has some work to slowly lift the center by using some framing and to prevent further damage to the fiberglass.
(It is my understanding) that my caraboat sat stagnate with interior gutted out for over 25years 
She has spider cracks throughout the yellow striping and steps fractures, "extra"  holes drilled here and there and so on... I will try to add some close up pictures.